Seventh Biennial Report of the UN Secretary-General on Disarmament and Non-proliferation Education

Seventh Biennial Report of the UN Secretary-General on Disarmament and Non-proliferation Education

The Seventh Biennial Report of the Secretary-General on Disarmament and Non-proliferation Education (A/71/124) was submitted to the 71st session of the General Assembly to review the implementation of the recommendations of the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education. Given the high number of submissions received by civil society organizations, only summaries were included in the report.

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Report Introduction

1. In paragraph 2 of its resolution 69/65, entitled “United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education”, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to prepare a report reviewing the results of the implementation of the recommendations made in the study (A/57/124) and possible new opportunities for promoting disarmament and non-proliferation education, and to submit it to the Assembly at its seventy-first session. Recommendation 32 of the United Nations study encouraged the Secretary-General to prepare a biennial report along the same lines.

2. Recommendation 31 of the study, inter alia, encouraged Member States to inform the Office for Disarmament Affairs of steps taken to implement the recommendations contained in the report.

3. The present report contains information compiled by the Secretary-General on the implementation of the recommendations of the study by Member States, the United Nations and other international, regional and non-governmental organizations and should be read in conjunction with the 34 recommendations of the study. According to the information received, activities associated with recommendations 1 to 6, 8, 12 to 15 and 17 to 34 were implemented during the reporting period. Pursuant to United Nations guidelines on limiting documentation, the information contained in the present report, as well as additional material, is available at www.un.org/disarmament/education.

4. By its resolution 69/71, the General Assembly also requested the SecretaryGeneral to submit to the Assembly at its seventy-first session a report covering the implementation of the activities of the United Nations Disarmament Information Programme. The two reports should be read in conjunction.

5. In a series of resolutions adopted at its sixty-ninth and seventieth sessions, the General Assembly reaffirmed the usefulness of the three regional centres for peace and disarmament of the Office for Disarmament Affairs — in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean — in disseminating educational materials and in promoting and implementing educational programmes. Separate reports to the Assembly on the three regional centres provide detailed information on their activities.1

6. The United Nations disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services programme continues to be the Office for Disarmament Affairs largest annual training programme. A separate report on its activities has been submitted to the General Assembly at its seventy-first session (A/71/95).

Report Conclusions

102. Governments, international organizations and civil society groups have continued to increase digital content and their use of and access to new technologies, such as social media tools, to disseminate information and reach a wider audience. It is noteworthy that the enhanced digital tools provide a platform for two-way conversation and increased interaction and exchanges between and among groups around the world.

103. The partnership among Governments, local governments, international, regional and subregional organizations and civil society organizations, including academic institutions, have been significantly strengthened and, in some cases, institutionalized in promoting disarmament and non-proliferation education.

104. New technologies and strengthened partnership among different groups enabled them to reach out to people in all corners of the world to promote their understanding of disarmament and non-proliferation issues. 105. The present report contains a significant increase in feedback from civil society groups, including tertiary academic institutions, concerning their activities to raise awareness of the threats posed by weapons of mass destruction and illicit small arms and light weapons. It is important to bring the discussion of these critical issues to schools in all countries to inform and empower young people to become agents of peace by helping them to mobilize, act and promote the importance of disarmament and non-proliferation.

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