Mavic Cabrera-Balleza, International Coordinator of GNWP, speaking at a localization training in Sierra Leone.

Translating global policies into practical and necessary actions—one village at a time. The impact of the Localization of Resolutions 1325 and 1820 in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone is one of 13 countries in Africa that have adopted a national action plan on UN Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820. The Localization program, initiated by the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, is a people-based, bottom-up approach to policy-making and policy implementation that guarantees local ownership and participation.

Patience Ikpeh, Cora Weiss Peacebuilding Fellow for the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, speaks at a localization training in Kenya.

Localized Training Efforts on Implementing the UNSCR 1325: Lessons Learned and Emerging Possibilities

The Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, in its effort to bridge the gap between global policy and local action on issues of Women, Peace and Security initiated the Localization of UNSCR 1325 and 1820 program. This is a people-based, bottom-up approach to policy-making that goes beyond the local adoption of a law, as it guarantees the alignment and harmonization of local, national, regional and international policies and community-driven strategies to ensure local ownership, participation and links among communities, civil society organizations and government.

Hundreds of women from the 'Women Wage Peace' movement take part in a march in support of peace at the Baptismal Site of Qasr al Yahud, near the West Bank city of Jericho, October 19, 2016. (Photo: Flash90)

How thousands of Palestinian and Israeli women are waging peace

Thousands of Palestinian and Israeli women marched in Jerusalem and Jericho this month demanding peace from their societies. They are doing so by reaching past and through stereotypes and artificial boundaries to find true partners. Such efforts are given little, often inaccurately reported and interpreted, coverage by the standard media. So it is through the networks of women’s civil society organizations and initiatives that we learn of them. We believe that linking peace educators’ networks to those of civil society activists is essential to the field’s having the information necessary to inquiring into the multiple possibilities for action among those they are educating for responsible global citizenship. So we offer this article hoping that it will be adapted for peacelearning purposes.