Measuring global citizenship education: A collection of practices and tools

This toolkit is the result of the collective efforts of the Global Citizenship Education Working Group (GCED-WG), a collegium of 90 organizations and experts co-convened by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at the Brookings Institution, and the United Nations Secretary General’s Global Education First Initiative’s Youth Advocacy Group (GEFI-YAG).

Community-based learning for sustainable development

To stress to policymakers and other stakeholders the wide and far-reaching benefits of community-based learning, particularly in the light of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning has published a new policy brief, “Community-based learning for sustainable development.” This policy brief advances six principles of action to develop the role of community learning centres as the main delivery mechanism for community-based learning: responding, engaging, enabling, embedding, sustaining and transforming.

(Photo: © Canadian Commission for UNESCO)

Education connects peace and development in sustainable ways says Director-General at UNESCO Week opening

UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova officially opened the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Education in Ottawa, Canada on 8 March together with Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Government of Canada, and Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Education, Government of Ontario.

The 5-day event is gathering more than 400 experts, practitioners and policymakers from across the world to examine pedagogical approaches and teaching practices to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and Global Citizenship Education (GCED).

UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development highlights teachers’ role in achieving Global Development Agenda

More than 400 experts, practitioners and policymakers from the public, non-governmental and private sector from all regions attended the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Education, in Ottawa, Canada from 6 to 10 March. UNESCO launched a new publication on this occasion, “Education for Sustainable Development Goals: Learning Objectives,” to support policy-makers, curriculum developers and educators to promote learning for the SDGs.

UN Volunteer Simon Kuany (far right), Associate Project Officer with the UNESCO Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development, with participants at an Inquiry and Integration workshop in New Delhi, India. (Photo: UNV, 2016)

Promoting global citizenship through learning and dialogue

Simon Kuany (South Sudan) is a UN Volunteer with the UNESCO Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development (MGIEP), in New Delhi, India. Funded generously by the Indian Government, MGIEP was formed in 2012 and since then has contributed to transforming education for humanity. It is an integral part of UNESCO, and the organization’s specialist institute on education for peace and sustainable development to foster global citizenship.

Learning to live together sustainably (SDG4.7): Trends and Progress

UNESCO contributes to the measuring of progress towards Target 4.7 of Sustainable Development Goal 4 on Education which focuses on Global Citizenship Education (GCED) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). This webpage publishes regular reports, news, analyses and publications produced by UNESCO and its partners which provide evidence and links to data sets that indicate how the world is progressing towards the achievement of this Target.

Irene Bronzini, an Italian UN Youth Volunteer fully funded by Belgium, preparing a presentation with her colleague, Lassane. (Photo: UNESCO/M. Blanco, 2017)

Peace is about education first! (UN Volunteers)

Irene Bronzini is a UN Youth Volunteer fully funded by Belgium, who was assigned in Mali in 2015 with UNESCO’s social sciences department. Irene, who is of Italian origin, supports the department in co-running UNESCO’s youth and peace education programmes.

(Photo: © Ewha Womans University / ISVP)

How can education prevent school violence and bullying based on ethnic discrimination?

UNESCO organized a workshop on Global Citizenship Education as part of the International Symposium on School Violence and Bullying: From Evidence to Action that took place in Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Learning to live together in peace through Global Citizenship Education

This UNESCO video explains the importance of Global Citizenship Education (GCED) in a globalized and increasingly interconnected and interdependent world. GCED is key to understand the interconnections between the local and the global and nurture a sense of belonging to a common humanity. It builds motivation to assume active roles to contribute to a more just, peaceful, tolerant and sustainable world.

(Photo: UNESCO)

Teaching about genocide and mass atrocities: An entry point to peace education

UNESCO supports education on the history of past genocides as a means to raise awareness of the causes, dynamics and consequences of such atrocities and to build resilience to violence and to contribute to a culture of peace based on mutual respect and human rights. As such, UNESCO partnered with the National Commission of Senegal to UNESCO to organize a training seminar for high-level civil servants of the Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, the Gambia, Mali, Niger and Senegal ministries of education in Dakar November 24-25, 2016.

Syrian refugee students sit in their classroom at a Lebanese public school. (Photo: Hussein Malla/AP)

Open dialogue in schools is the first step in fighting violent extremism

Simply telling young people about the evils of violent extremism is not enough. What is needed is a holistic education model that lays emphasis on dialogue, fosters critical thinking skills, inculcates respect for diversity and gives the students the socio-emotional and behavioural skills that will help deconstruct the messaging used to promote violence.

Education policy-makers and youth agree on the way forward for the prevention of violent extremism through education

Over 200 senior education policy-makers, experts, as well as youth advocates in the field, from close to 70 countries came together in New Delhi, India, from 19 to 20 September, for the first “UNESCO International Conference on the Prevention of Violent Extremism through Education: Taking Action”.

Preventing violent extremism with skills, education and dialogue (UNESCO)

Skills, jobs, freedom of expression and more culture and history – these are the responses that must be nurtured in the face of violent extremism stated UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova at an event organized by Albania, Jordan and the Holy See on 20 September 2016.‎ ‎”Tackling this threat is a huge responsibility, of which UNESCO is deeply aware, and this is why we are acting across the board,” said Bokova. “This goes to the heart of the UNESCO Constitution, to build the defences of peace in the minds of women and men, starting with education, starting with the soft power of learning, the sciences, intercultural dialogue, on the basis of shared values.”