(Photo via Ms. Magazine)

Peace Heroes: Bushra Qadeem Hyder on Fighting Extremism with Education in Pakistan

Hyder is a pioneer in education—not only bringing the principles of peace education into her own school, but also integrating a comprehensive peace curriculum throughout an entire school system. Through Hyder’s peace education, pupils are exposed to the religious and cultural teachings of other communities, promoting understanding and acceptance.

A peace poetry gathering in Khyber Pakhtunkwa. (Photo: Wehmi Aurakzai)

Peace poetry: a burgeoning movement in Pakistan’s KP province

Adnan Bangash, an avid reader of peace poetry, says the promotion of peaceful literature is the best way to guide people in the current chaotic circumstances in which the country finds itself. “Our land is combusting in the flames of war,” he says. “By spreading peace education, we can support society to turn away from conflict.”

Fazl-e-Rabi, left, president of the British Pashtoon Association, visits classes at the Zamung Kor orphanage in Peshawar April 9. [Photo: Karwan Tanzeem]

Education essential for peace, progress in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Two organizations, Karwan Tanzeem, based in Peshawar, and the British Pashtoon Association (BPA), based in the UK, are joining forces to raise the education level, create awareness among youth, and steer them away from militancy, violence and extremism.

Peace Education in Pakistan

Virtually every country in South Asia faces militancy and conflict to some extent. Pakistan has been especially prone. Peace education addresses the root causes of conflict and is thus a sustainable long-term solution in conflict resolution and prevention efforts. This report examines nine representative peace education initiatives in Pakistan to better understand what types of interventions were most effective, the differences and similarities between peace education programs and curricula in schools and madrassas, and what the peacebuilding field can draw from the selected case studies.

Education – a pathway to deradicalisation (Pakistan)

Dr Musarat Amin calls for compulsory peace education at levels 8-9-10 in public schools as students of these age groups are more prone to extremist ideologies. That peace education should be a combination of Islamic as well as Western literature that promotes tolerance, peaceful co-existence and harmony amongst different segments of the society.