50 year anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence” (April 4, 1967)

“Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence”, was delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1967, exactly one year before his assassination, at Riverside Church in New York City. The speech denounced the war in Vietnam and identified the triplets of evil: racism, materialism, and militarism.

International Peace Bureau Statement: A Prophetic Voice for Our Time – Honoring MLK Jr’s’ April 4, 1967 “Beyond Vietnam, Breaking the Silence” Speech

Fifty years ago, on April 4, 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered a speech which rings across the decades. It is among the most remarkable expressions of prophetic moral, intellectual and spiritual courage. In his speech, King broke ranks with pragmatic critics within the U.S. Civil Rights movement who feared the political blowback of denouncing President Johnson’s catastrophic war in Indochina, and named the greatest obstacles to freedom in the United States – and the West: the triple evils of racism, militarism and extreme materialism. Like the wisdom of the Prophets of old, King’s words and call for a “revolution of values” are as incisive and inspiring today as they were five decades ago.

(Image: CGNK)

Glenn D. Paige: pioneer of nonkilling studies and peace researcher (1929-2017)

On Sunday January 22, 2017, Glenn D. Paige passed away in Honolulu after struggling with illnesses at the age of 87. Founder of the Center for Global Nonkilling, his is a life that has given so much with his firm belief that the world could change for the better; and that killing could end with the advent and advances of the nonkilling knowledge.

(Photo: Tucson News Now)

Tucson students learn ‘non-violence’ way of life amidst anti-Trump protests

A rash of nationwide protests against president-elect Donald Trump have brought out thousands of demonstrators. Tucson students are participating in a two-day introduction to the Kingian Nonviolence training program, which aims to “institutionalize and internationalize nonviolence.”

Education and Training in Nonviolent Resistance

This report highlights key strategic functions and outcomes of education and training in nonviolent civil resistance movements around the world. Funded by the United States Institute of Peace (USIP), it draws on findings from research, trainer and participant interviews, and the author’s experience with nonviolent civil movements.

Educating for peace through (nonviolent) action: “122 easy [and difficult] actions for peace”

The book “122 easy (and difficult) actions for peace” is a useful tool for peace educators that aim for social change. Author Cécile Barbeito Thonon notes that Peace Education should not be an aim in itself but a mean to get more peaceful societies, it should change minds, attitudes and behaviors. More than that, these new attitudes and behaviors should be meaningful and strategic enough to transform the local or global context.

Call for proposals: Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship on Civil Resistance

The International Center on Nonviolent Conflict’s (ICNC) Doctoral and Junior Faculty Research Fellowship enables eligible applicants to carry out research on civil resistance and/or conduct a study that can benefit from a civil resistance perspective, as part of their dissertation or for an upcoming book, journal article or book chapter. For 2016, $20,000 in total has been allotted for this program. Each Fellowship award ranges between $2,000 and $10,000. The deadline to apply is May 30, 2016.

Representatives of the organizations participating in Pivot to Peace (Photo: provided)

Pivot to Peace aims to foster hope, reduce violence

(Louisville, KY) For young people who have been shot or stabbed, that key moment for change can occur while they are in the hospital, recovering from their injuries. This brief window of time — of vulnerability and rethinking their lives — is when an innovative new initiative called Pivot to Peace will offer the respect, skills and resources to strengthen participants, supporting them in a crucial pivot to a healthier, nonviolent way of life.

Intro to Roadmap: Online Course

The Metta Center for Nonviolence strives to help people from all walks of life to discover the power of nonviolence, and to understand how to use nonviolence safely and effectively. One of the educational resources they have developed to this effect is the Roadmap model, and the latest addition to the model is the Roadmap online course. This free online course is self-paced, so you can start anytime and go at your own pace.