In refugee camps, education is a priority for many parents. Here, children explain they can safely attend school every day. (Photo: https://flic.kr/p/RdXHqb)

Iraq’s Crisis in Education: Dismantling the Roots of Extremism

It is important to closely examine how the Iraqi government is rebuilding a conflict-sensitive educational system that will hopefully devote itself to both the mental health and the intellectual development of young Iraqi children. With this in mind, a peace education program seems like a viable solution for Iraqi children.

Youth wearing traditional dress dance in Iraq in February 2017 as part of a community event celebrating cultural and faith differences. The event was just one of many culminating projects that resulted from youth peacebuilding and leadership trainings faciliated by the Iraqi al-Amani Association and Eastern Mennonite University's Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. (Photo courtesy of the Iraqi al-Amani Association)

Iraqi youth work to build culture of peace

A youth project in Iraq brings together Eastern Mennonite University’s Center for Justice and Peacebuilding and the Iraqi al-Amal Association in a multi-phase project that focuses on youth and academics to build a culture of peace in the country.

Nabaa holds a trophy with her basketball teammates after winning a game against a nearby school. (Photo: ©UNICEF/ Iraq/ 2015/ Anmar)

In Kirkuk, teamwork builds tolerance

UNICEF has been responding to friction and shortages in Kirkuk by establishing a programme to foster peace and tolerance, starting in schools. “It’s essential that education provision is equitable and that schools are conflict-sensitive so that they can promote peace,” says Kelsey Shanks, a consultant with UNICEF.