Teach-in Report: Fostering and Sustaining Allyship at Georgetown – A Dialogue on Understanding Privilege

On April 18th, the Peace Education class at Georgetown University, taught by Professor Anthony Jenkins, facilitated a teach-in on allyship to address institutionalized violence against oppressed identities emboldened by the current political climate. Through this teach-in, participants acquire the necessary peace-building skills and assets to become active allies beyond Georgetown and to their communities. By acknowledging the privilege innate in oneself, individuals learn to utilize their rights to listen to the oppressed in order to support them in their ongoing endeavor of obtaining freedom.

Diversity Book Club – Exploring “Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People”

Peace educator Susan Gelber Cannon hosts a virtual Diversity Book Club on her blog where she summarizes books and provides classroom applications and resources for teachers interested in building welcoming and inclusive environments in their classrooms and schools. This particular session explores Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People, a book of particular relevance to the Global Campaign for Peace Education and International Institute on Peace Education’s call for campus teach-ins on identity-based violence.

Harvard Launches Free Online Class To Promote Religious Literacy

To combat religious illiteracy, six religion professors from Harvard University, Harvard Divinity School and Wellesley College are kicking off a free, online series on world religions open to the masses. The courses are being offered via an online learning platform called edX, which Harvard University launched with Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012.

Book review – “Interfaith leadership: a primer” by Eboo Patel

In this book review, Betty Reardon suggests that Eboo Patel’s “Interfaith leadership: a primer” is an invaluable resource for peace education. In this manual on the development of interfaith leadership, Patel provides a model for the construction of learning programs intended to develop fundamental knowledge and practical skills of peacemaking in this society and with adaptations to the global level, providing all the components of the design and implementation of a peacelearning curriculum.

Hate groups increase for second consecutive year as Trump electrifies radical right

The Global Campaign for Peace Education reminds you of our call to Address Identity-based Violence through Teach-ins at American Universities. This report on hate groups from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) may provide meaningful substance for learning toward action that addresses identity-based violence. According to SPLC’s annual census of hate groups and other extremist organizations, the number of hate groups in the United States rose for a second year in a row in 2016 as the radical right was energized by the candidacy of Donald Trump.

A group paints the exterior of the Ashburn Colored School. (Photo: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

Teens behind racist graffiti sentenced to visit Holocaust Museum, read books by black and Jewish authors

Five boys spray-painted a historic black school in Ashburn, Va., with swastikas, “WHITE POWER” and vulgar images. Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney Alex Rueda prepared an unusual sentence recommendation meant to educate them on the meaning of hate speech in the hope that they come to understand the effect their behavior had on the community. The boys have been sentenced to read books from a list that includes works by prominent black, Jewish and Afghan authors, write a research paper on hate speech, go to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and listen to an interview with a former student of the Ashburn Colored School, which they defaced.

A call to Address Identity-based Violence through Teach-ins at American* Universities

While identity violence is not unique to the US it is in our own society that we have the opportunity and responsibility to take civic action toward overcoming it. American universities have a history of rising to such challenges, producing responses of learning/action on campuses across the country. The IIPE believes that the new epidemics of hate, particularly Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, should be similarly confronted by the academic community. We invite you to share resources and join us in undertaking teach-ins on campuses and in communities across the US and around the world.