Opinion

Give peace (education) a chance (United Kingdom)

Under the UK’s “Prevent” policy, nurseries, schools and universities are treated as places where the growth of radical extremism may be undermined. Educators are expected to instil “British values” in their students while also being on the lookout for signs of extremist behaviour or attitudes, which they are required to report. By contrast, when working in other parts of the world, the UK government encourages a different approach – peace education. [continue reading…]
Opinion

Peace Elitism

How can we consider peace so that all Americans recognize that their welfare and prosperity are tied to it? How can peace be democratized in a way that people of all economic, ethnic, and social backgrounds can embrace its aims? Why must peace be something that West Coast Prius owners embrace, but West Virginia coal miners do not? Peace has an elitism problem. [continue reading…]
Activity Reports

Who are They, Anyway? Finally meeting the strangers in our own land

Libby and Len Traubman, founders of the Beyond War Movement of the 1980s, are inviting people from their community to participate in an open process of respectful communication, beginning with a new quality of listening to one another, to everyone. “We’re confident that this local public action to know the ‘other’ will give voices to the unheard and dignify everyone, especially the listeners.” [continue reading…]
No Picture
Opinion

Peace Education in the schools of Jammu and Kashmir

For 26 years the conflict situations prevailing in Jammu and Kashmir have impacted the education sector badly. During the peak of insurgency, a number of school buildings were either damaged or gutted. In these years, many schools have been targeted by the militants. Conflict in J&K is affecting the children’s innocent minds. [continue reading…]
News & Highlights

In a Time of Islamophobia, Teach With Complexity

When teaching about the Middle East and North Africa, U.S. teachers are often confronted with a dearth of accurate and nuanced material about the history, politics and people of the region. This crisis of critical awareness mainly materializes through two recurring narratives that circulate in mainstream media, political discourse and popular culture: “Islam as anti-Western” and conflict fueled by “ancient hatreds.” These narratives work in tandem to produce a one-dimensional conception of the MENA, which, in turn, fuels the rising Islamophobia in U.S. schools and society. [continue reading…]