The academics say the learning style approach is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging. (Photo: Alamy Stock Photo)

Teachers must ditch ‘neuromyth’ of learning styles, say scientists

Eminent academics from worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology voice concerns over popularity of method noting that it is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging as it can lead to a fixed approach that could impair pupils’ potential to apply or adapt themselves to different ways of learning.

Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu

Security, education crucial to peace building – Minister of Education (Nigeria)

The Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu, says improving human security and education are crucial to peace-building and can only be achieved through the collective efforts of stakeholders. ““It is against this backdrop that the Federal Ministry of Education takes the issue of education of Nigerian child very seriously. They are the building blocks of peace in the society and our future.”

Teachers College study finds gap between refugee policy and practice hinders urban refugee children’s access to education

The increasing urbanization of the world’s displaced people presents unique obstacles to displaced children attempting to attend local schools, despite their widely recognized right to do so, according to a report released by Teachers College. The report, titled “Urban Refugee Education: Strengthening Policies and Practices for Access, Quality, and Inclusion,” is the first-ever global study of urban refugee education.

Japan – IICBA Signing Ceremony for the project ‘Teacher Training and Development for Peace-Building in the Horn of Africa and Surrounding Countries

The government of Japan is providing of 1 million USD to the International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa (IICBA) for the project ‘Teacher Training and Development for Peace-Building in the Horn of Africa and Surrounding Countries’, which will support teachers and teacher educators from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Uganda.

Columbia University associate professor Dr. Chris Emdin says the “white hero” narrative is setting up both teachers and students for failure. (Photo courtesy of Diedre Reznik)

What ‘white folks who teach in the hood’ get wrong about education

Dr. Chris Emdin, associate professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College and associate director of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education, has had enough of what he calls a pervasive narrative in urban education: a savior complex that gives mostly white teachers in minority and urban communities a false sense of saving kids.

Youth Group photo at IPYG Peace Forum (Photo: IPYG)

Youth movements for building peace in South Africa

‘A Piece by Peace: A Sustainable Peace Dialogue’ was co-hosted by Africa Unite (AU) and the International Peace Youth Group on the 23rd February in Cape Town, South Africa. The topic of the forum was: How can we as youth, working with government ensure that we build safe and peaceful communities and create a culture of peace enshrined in the Declaration of Peace and Cessation of War.

Evaluation of the Transformative Potential of Positive Gender Socialization in Education for Peacebuilding

UNICEF commissioned American Institutes for Research (AIR) to conduct an evaluation of the Karamoja, Uganda, pilot of the programme Gender Socialization in Schools: Enhancing the transformative power of education for peacebuilding. Supported by UNICEF and the Ugandan Ministry of Education, Science, Technology and Sports, the programme aimed to trial a practical, school-based intervention to demonstrate the peacebuilding potential of positive gender socialization in the conflict-affected Karamoja region of north-eastern Uganda.

Morton Deutsch, Pioneer in Conflict Resolution, Cooperative Learning and Social Justice, Passes Away at 97

Teachers College professor emeritus Morton Deutsch, one of the world’s foremost social psychologists and a pioneer of the fields of conflict resolution, cooperative learning and social justice, has passed away at 97. Deutsch’s ideas have been applied to marital conflict, education, industry and labor negotiations and international relations, yet always with an emphasis on human interrelatedness as a basis for finding common cause.

(Photo: © Canadian Commission for UNESCO)

Education connects peace and development in sustainable ways says Director-General at UNESCO Week opening

UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova officially opened the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Education in Ottawa, Canada on 8 March together with Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Government of Canada, and Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Education, Government of Ontario.

The 5-day event is gathering more than 400 experts, practitioners and policymakers from across the world to examine pedagogical approaches and teaching practices to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and Global Citizenship Education (GCED).

Snack time at a Montessori school in Bangalore, India [Photo by Nagarjun Kandukuru/CC BY]

Growing Peace: Gandhi, Montessori and What It Means to Begin with the Children

Education has a vital role in cultivating peace. This is not so much a question of curricula as the kind of engagement fostered in the classroom, writes Mitch Bogen, examining the approach to peace education of Montessori and Gandhi.

UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development highlights teachers’ role in achieving Global Development Agenda

More than 400 experts, practitioners and policymakers from the public, non-governmental and private sector from all regions attended the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development: The Role of Education, in Ottawa, Canada from 6 to 10 March. UNESCO launched a new publication on this occasion, “Education for Sustainable Development Goals: Learning Objectives,” to support policy-makers, curriculum developers and educators to promote learning for the SDGs.

(Photo: UNAMID/Albert González Farran)

Keeping Education Safe

For many children around the world, having a safe space to learn is far from guaranteed due to the threat of armed conflict and the targeting of schools. In this guest post for ‘In Focus’, Peter Klanduch and Margaret Sinclair of Education Above All’s legal advocacy programme PEIC – Protect Education in Insecurity and Conflict (PEIC) – explain the background to this global problem and the importance of keeping education safe for all children.