Header
---

Dear subscriber,

We are excited to feature an article this month by Betty Reardon, one of the originators of the Global Campaign.  Betty shares powerful reflections of her experiences and solidarity with the courageous people of Okinawa in their nonviolent resistance to the militarization that reduces their security and detracts from the quality of their daily lives. She also offers several possibilities for integrating lessons from the Okinawan experience into peace education.  

As always, please help us to #spreadPeaceEd by using our hashtag, following us on social media, and by sharing and reposting news on your timeline and in your communities.  The Global Campaign is very active on Facebook and Twitter.  

In peace & solidarity,

Tony Jenkins
Coordinator, Global Campaign for Peace Education

---

Featured Article(s)

---
Civil Resistance to Militarization: A Glimpse of Okinawa’s Nonviolent, Courageous and Tenacious Struggle for a Democratic Security Policy

Civil Resistance to Militarization: A Glimpse of Okinawa’s Nonviolent, Courageous and Tenacious Struggle for a Democratic Security Policy

Betty A. Reardon

Founding Director Emeritus, International Institute on Peace Education
www.i-i-p-e.org 

Resilient Resistance

The early October rain was steady, punctuated by downpours that leaked through the canvas sheltering about 100 Okinawan citizens, seated in resistance to the construction of a military heliport at Henoko. Many had been there at a gate to Camp Schwab (one of the 33 US bases in the prefecture) for hours as we approached in late morning. I was among a small delegation of Okinawa Women Act Against Military Violence (OWAAM), with whom I have been in solidarity since the late 1990s. Under the leadership of Suzuyo Takazato, founder of OWAAM and a former member of the Naha City Assembly, the prefectural capital, these women have been among the most active in the resistance. They regularly join delegations to the US to inform American citizens and appeal to Congress members, government agencies and NGOs for help in demilitarizing Okinawa.

Our delegation joined the gathering listening to a series of resisters, some of them daily participants in this protest for over ten years of civil resistance to the extension of the US militarization of Japan, a constant oppressive presence for the seven decades since the bloody battle of Okinawa that ended World War II. In short animated talks, some referring to the long-term stationing of US military, a series of speakers made the case against the construction that would exponentially increase the negative effects of the military bases that cover about 20% percent of this, the main island of the former independent Kingdom of the Ryukyus. The islands seized by Japan in 1879 are now a prefecture of the mainland Japanese government. Although Okinawa has an independently elected governor, its own prefectural assembly, and has one representative in the national Diet, it continues to be managed as a colony.

While all the speakers agreed on the need to restore control of the land occupied by the bases to the prefecture, they brought different perspectives and represented the variety of people gathered under the canvas who were of all ages, occupations and from many parts of the island. They were participants in a long-term, nonviolent citizens’ resistance to the military presence that first manifested itself as a major movement in 1995 when tens of thousands participated in a citizens’ rally in Ginowan city. This rally was a denunciation of the most recent sexual assault committed by US military personnel, the rape of a 12 year old school girl by three servicemen. It also brought attention to the range of crimes and other socially and environmentally damaging effects of the bases, debasing the quality of their lives and undermining their human security (a partial accounting of the first five decades of these crimes which continue to the present is chronicled in “List of Main Crimes Committed and Incidents Concerning the U.S. Military on Okinawa,” 1948-1995). Yoshitami Ohshiro, a long-time member of the City Assembly of Nago, in noting the further negative effects that would result from the presence of the soon to be constructed dual runway landing strip, spoke of an independent study of the potential environmental impacts of the planned airbase being conducted by an environmental scientist at the University of the Ryukyus, a study that will be of use not only to the indigenous resistance, but also to those American and international peace and environmental activists who support their struggle.

As one such activist, I was invited to address the group, expressing through interpretation by Dr. Kozue Akibayashi of Doshisha Unversity in Kyoto, my admiration for their courage and tenacity. Indeed, some resisters present were among those who had risked life and limb, in small rubber rafts that were paddled out into the bay to turn back the early stages of the strategic surveys to identify specific locations for the sea-based construction. Their courage was to be tested again in less than two weeks from the day of this visit when local police and Japanese military forcefully put down their human chain. This human chain was attempting to block the construction equipment and personnel the mainland government had dispatched to commence the construction as reported the Rykyu Shimpo.

One of those roughly displaced was a fellow octogenarian, Fumiko Shimabukuro, a staunch resister, present daily at the protest site. She and I conversed with the help of Dr. Akibayashi. She told me that her participation in this struggle to prevent the construction of the airbase, and all the years of protesting the presence of the US military bases derived from a basic commitment to the larger cause of the abolition of war. She recounted the horrors of the Battle of Okinawa endured by the civilian population and her own soul-searing experience as a young teen-ager, caught in the mayhem and trauma of the US invasion, memories kept sharply alive by the continuous wide-spread presence of the military throughout her island home. Her struggle will end only with the withdrawal of the bases or with the end of her life.

Military Assault on the Natural Environment

From the sit-in at the Camp Schwab gate we went on to another resistance site at the shore from which the runways will extend into Oura Bay. Hiroshi Ashitomi, Co-chair of the Conference Opposing Heliport Construction and leader in charge of the water front construction site resistance camp, informed us of some of the already known environmental consequences of this off shore militarization; among them threats to aquatic wild life that is witnessed on his business card with a tiny drawing of a sea turtle and a dugong (this mammal is much the same as the manatee, native to the Caribbean and Tampa Bay). One particularly destructive expected environmental consequence is the breaking down of the coral reefs that have served since their original formation as a barrier, mitigating the force of major storms and tsunamis.

Mr. Ashitomi also brought reports of these effects in one of the periodic visits to the US Congress by delegations of members of the resistance who believe that if the actual consequences of long-term military presence are known to the American people and their representatives, the situation is more likely to change. It was this same belief that inspired the first of such delegations organized by Okinawa Women Against Military Violence, in the Peace Caravan to various American cities in 1996. Suzuyo Takazato with some of that delegation visited Teachers College Columbia University - where I was then offering peace education. She outlined for us the realities of the Okinawa situation with regard to the environmental destruction and the sexual violence against women that has been perpetrated by US military personnel since the time of the Battle of Okinawa to the present (a chronology of these sexual assaults is available on request). This particular form of military violence against women is generally overlooked in addressing aspects of war and conflict that incite crimes of violence against women (VAW). The Okinawa situation calls attention to the relevance of VAW in strategic staging areas and under long term military presence to one of the three major goals of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women Peace and Security, protection of women against the gender based violence integral to war. The facts documented in the OWAAM chronology demonstrate that this protection is needed in areas of preparation for combat as well as in the midst of armed conflict. Feminists see a significant connection between violence against the environment and the gender based violence that motivates the activism of OWAAM and feminist peace movements elsewhere also striving to reduce and eliminate military bases in their own respective regions, to overcome this and other forms of suffering common to host communities around the world. 

Forced Militarization of Okinawa Contradicts American Democratic Values

This report is written in support of base reduction and withdrawal and in solidarity with the courageous people of Okinawa in their non-violent resistance to the militarization that reduces their security and detracts from the quality of their daily lives. Indeed, all of us are affected to some degree by the global network of US bases, and many feel called to resist, urging public consideration of alternative less violent security systems. For Americans a significant mode of resistance to militarism in all its forms and in all its locations, might well be standing in support of the calls for the recognition of the rights of the Okinawan people to participate in making the decisions that affect their daily lives and the sustainability of the natural environment of their islands. We might also strive with them for liberation from the colonial status to which they have been consigned by the governments of Japan and the United States. So that readers so inclined might be more fully informed of the situation several references and links to sources of information not available in our media are noted here.

The conditions that prevail in Okinawa as a consequence of the long-term military presence while particular to that island, are not unique. Similar situations are to be found in approximately 1000 communities throughout the world that host the myriad military bases maintained by the United States (information on Wikipedia not entirely accurate, but presents a good view of the extent and density of US military bases world-wide). The implication of this global network of long-term presence of the American military for peace educators and peace activists are also myriad, both general and particular.

Implications for Peace Education

The Okinawa experience provides an educationally fruitful case for learning some of the vivid particularities of local civil society actions as a realm in which to exercise global citizenship. Similar actions are undertaken in other locations of long-term US military presence. Study of the international anti-base movement could illuminate the destructive consequences of the current militarized global security system to the well-being of host communities, undermining the human security of local populations. Further, and more important to the normative and ethical dimensions of peace education, these civil society actions are vivid examples of the refusal of base communities to accept the powerlessness that security policy makers assume when they make the decisions that ignore the will and welfare of the citizens most affected. Becoming aware of the courageous confrontation of the most powerful nation state in the world and its allied states by citizens who exercise local civic responsibility, universal human dignity and democratic political rights can provide learners with knowledge that resistance to militarization is possible. Though it may not immediately achieve its goals, such resistance can, no matter how slowly, reduce some negative conditions and processes, perhaps paving the way toward an alternative to the militarized security system, certainly empowering the citizen participants. As in the case of the recent prefectural elections in Okinawa that resoundingly rejected the bases, it can have some meaningful if limited, some times temporary political effect. It demonstrated that few among the Okinawan electorate continue to believe that the limited economic advantages outweigh the current and cumulative human, social and environmental disadvantages of hosting the bases. So too, it manifest the claims of the citizens to their right to participate in the security policy- making process that so profoundly affects them. When such manifestations continue over time and in other areas, even in the face of governments’ intransigence, they are testimony to the tenacity in which lies the hope of positive change in the current security system. Such intransigence was evident in the passage of “The New Security Law.” This step toward PM Abe’s goal of remilitarizing the country, ultimately abrogating Article 9 of the Japanese constitution which renounced war, brought thousands into the streets, demonstrating against the law and calling for the preservation of Article 9. The struggle to maintain the integrity of the Japanese constitution continues to engage large numbers of peace-minded Japanese citizens, many of whom participate in the Global Article 9 Campaign to Abolish War.

Taking stock of such resistance and its consequences could also serve as a route to a broader and deeper study of proposals and possibilities for alternative, demilitarized security systems and citizens’ efforts to bring them to the attention of the public and security policy makers. Study of the Okinawa situation, along with conditions in other base host communities within a critical assessment of the present militarized security system is an essential foundation for assessing proposed alternatives. Inquiry into the arguments and actions of the international anti-base movement could provide a basis for the study of constructive citizen initiatives, national, bi-national, transnational and local civic action which goes beyond and complements civil resistance, a whole range of nonviolent strategies for the reduction of militarism and the ultimate transformation from conflict based militarized state security to justice based human security. These strategies, rooted in and facilitated by relevant peace education, hold the potential to change concepts of and ways of thinking about national security. Considering multiple alternative security systems, shifting from a focus on the security of the state to one on the enhancement of the well-being of the peoples of a nation, emphasizing a holistic and comprehensive approach to security would enable peace education to prepare citizens to conceptualize and do the political work of disarming and demilitarizing the international system.

Inquiry into alternative security systems is an effective learning tool to introduce holistic perspectives and comprehensive approaches to security such as those offered by a human rather than a state-centered perspective. Convergence of three relevant fields of education: environmental, human rights and peace education - connections long part of a feminist analysis of the problems of war and armed violence - is essential in these days of seeking to understand the probable causes and responses to the climate crisis, the increase in terrorism, steps toward disarmament and demilitarization, freeing the pursuit of human rights from the vice of national security states, and the urgency of gender equality to all and any issues of peace and security. Certainly, the gendered effects of the presence of military bases makes UN Security Council Resolution 1325 a fundamental component of peace education specifically directed toward learnings to capacitate citizens to bring their governments to serious action toward the demilitarization of security.

The GCPE plans to publish teaching procedures for undertaking such learning in university and secondary school classrooms. Suggestions for learning units for adaptation to the teaching circumstances of individual educators will be offered. Some peace educators hope to promote such inquiry together with the dissemination of knowledge of the effects of US bases and raising awareness of the courageous, tenacious and inspiring resistance and civil actions of the people of Okinawa and other base host communities throughout the world. The issues are relevant to peace education in all nations, as all are involved and/or affected by world-wide militarization. In particular they are crucial knowledge for all US citizens in whose names the global network of American military bases has been established and continues to be expanded as recently reported. “…. the Pentagon has proposed a new plan to the White House to build up a string of military bases in Africa, Southwest Asia and the Middle East” (The New York Times, December 10 - Pentagon Seeks to Knit Foreign Bases Into ISIS-Foiling Network) as a strategy to counter the growth of adherents to ISIS. Will it be possible for the peace community to proposes and call to public attention alternatives to ever expanding militarization as the major approach to holding back and overcoming the exponential increase of these and all threats to national and global security? The author and colleagues in the Global Campaign for Peace Education intend to provide means to acquire and apply some of the knowledge relevant to responsible civil action in response to this challenge.

For further information on the impacts of Military Bases in Okinawa see:

• Report from Okinawa: Long-term Military Presence (Suzuyo Takazato)

• Women in Okinawa – Continuing Struggle against the Violence of US Military (Suzuyo Takazato)

• Okinawa: Effects of Long-term US Military presence

• Women & the U.S. Military in East Asia (Incite!)

About the author: Betty A. Reardon is a world-renowned leader in the fields of peace education and human rights; her pioneering work has laid the foundation for a new cross-disciplinary integration of peace education and international human rights from a gender-conscious, global perspective.

Read more.

---

News & Views

(News, Opinion, Activity Reports)

---
Dr. Herbert L. Abrams, Who Worked Against Nuclear War, Dies at 95

Dr. Herbert L. Abrams, Who Worked Against Nuclear War, Dies at 95

Dr. Herbert L. Abrams, a radiologist at Stanford and Harvard Universities, died on Jan. 20 at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He was 95. Dr. Abrams served as founding vice president of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, which was awarded the Unesco Prize for Peace Education in 1984 and the Nobel Peace Prize a year later. In announcing the award, the Nobel Committee said the group had performed an important service “by spreading authoritative information and by creating an awareness of the catastrophic consequences of atomic warfare.”

Read more...

Call to Contribute Ideas/Curricula & Report of Recent Actions Supporting the UN Open Ended Working Group on Nuclear Disarmament

Call to Contribute Ideas/Curricula & Report of Recent Actions Supporting the UN Open Ended Working Group on Nuclear Disarmament

On January 28, the UN Open Ended Working Group on nuclear disarmament (OEWG) will hold its first session in Geneva. The OEWG, open to all UN member states and to representatives of civil society, was established by the UN General Assembly to work on legal measures and norms to achieve a world without nuclear weapons. UNFOLD ZERO provides an overview of civil society actions and preparations for the OEWG and is hosting a competition to gather civil society actions - winners could win a trip to Geneva to participate in May sessions. In support of these efforts, the Global Campaign for Peace Education invites readers to submit study units and courses syllabi on nuclear disarmament that will be published on the Campaign website.

Read more...

“Let’s Live in Peace with our Neighbors” (Armenia)

“Let’s Live in Peace with our Neighbors” (Armenia)

An exhibition dedicated to peace titled “Let’s Live in Peace with our Neighbors” was launched 14.10.2015 at the UN House in Armenia. 165 school-children from 8 regions of Armenia participated in the contest organized by World Council of Churches Armenia Round Table and the NGO Women for Development. All children who participated in the contest received certificates of participation and special UN 70 gifts. 53 paintings were chosen and are currently being exhibited in the UN Lobby, the top three received awards while some others were given recognition by UN agencies.

Read more...

17 ways education influences the UN sustainable development goals

17 ways education influences the UN sustainable development goals

In September 2015 the United Nations committed to the new Sustainable Development Goals, which succeed the Millennium Development Goals. The SDGs outline a new and ambitious worldwide effort to reduce poverty and hunger, improve health, enable equality, protect the planet and much more. Real progress will be elusive unless all children receive a quality education. This article, by the Global Partnership for Education, outlines the many ways education influences all sustainable development goals.

Read more...

First Peace Education Training in Chin State, Myanmar

First Peace Education Training in Chin State, Myanmar

December 21-22 2015, The Institute for Security & Development Policy and the Myanmar Minerva Education Center (MMEC) supported the first ever peace education training to be held in Chin State, Myanmar. The training was organized by DAWN, which is one of the largest civil society organizations in Chin State. The workshop focused on political dialogue and was held in Tedim with 31 participants.

Read more...

Youth urged to use social media in helping eradicate biases against Muslims (Philippines)

Bai Rohaniza Sumndad-Usman, a founder of the youth group Teach Peace, Build Peace Movement, said young Filipinos could help break barriers set up by differences in religion, help build bridges of understanding among peoples, and help correct individual prejudices. She also stressed “the importance of building a culture of peace in creating different generations of peace builders. Through peace education, you are able to create a space for every Filipino to understand each other."

Read more...

Afghan displaced children and youth paint their lives

Afghan displaced children and youth paint their lives

This article showcases an innovative project implemented by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) in Iran and in Afghanistan in partnership with CREART, a Spanish NGO specializing in art for peace education. Through the delivery of a series of art therapy workshops, the project provides much needed psychosocial support to over four hundred Afghan children affected by displacement. The project also provides a positive insight into the lives of Afghan refugee youth and their displacement experience.

Read more...

How the world is proving Martin Luther King right about nonviolence

How the world is proving Martin Luther King right about nonviolence

Since 2011, the world has been a deeply contentious place. Although armed insurgencies rage across the Middle East, the Sahel and Southern Asia, violent civil conflicts are no longer the primary way that people seek to redress their grievances. Instead, from Tunis to Tahrir Square, from Zuccotti Park to Ferguson, from Burkina Faso to Hong Kong, movements worldwide have drawn on the lessons of Gandhi, King and everyday activists at home and abroad to push for change. (In 2011) when we drilled into the data, we found that nonviolent resistance campaigns don’t succeed by melting the hearts of their opponents. Instead, they tend to succeed because nonviolent methods have a greater potential for eliciting mass participation — on average, they elicit about 11 times more participants than the average armed uprising — and because this is the source of major power shifts within the opponent regime. That was 2011. Now it’s 2016. What have we learned about nonviolent resistance in the past five years? This article sketches some of the key empirical takeaways from political science, some of which have rather surprising implications for skeptics of nonviolent action.

Read more...

Refusing to Choose Between Martin and Malcolm: Ferguson, Black Lives Matter, and a New Nonviolent Revolution

Refusing to Choose Between Martin and Malcolm: Ferguson, Black Lives Matter, and a New Nonviolent Revolution

(Matt Meyer, Natalie Jeffers & David Ragland) 2015 was not only a year of fear, brutality and injustice, it was a year of sustained resistance that honoured not only a strong national Black radical politics of organising, but also helped cultivate a new and thriving, nonviolent international movement for Black Liberation. As we enter 2016, the Movement for Black Lives must navigate itself in uncharted territory and hazardous spaces, but is accompanied by a vigourous knowledge of self, a thriving and committed community of activists and organizers who are cognizant of the need for guiding principles and the creation of a Black Radical national policy platform. Liberation educator Paulo Freire noted that “violence is the tool of the master,” and feminist poet Audre Lorde reminded us that “You cannot dismantle the Master’s House with the Master’s Tools” So, let us reimagine new ways to build a society where Black people can live freely and dream, and let’s find, as Barbara Deming implored, “equilibrium” in our revolutionary process.

Read more...

Iraqi teachers' campaign strives to end violence against women

Iraqi teachers' campaign strives to end violence against women

In conjunction with the United Nations’ recent 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, Iraqi teachers organised a number of activities under the theme of “Home Peace to World Peace, Peaceful Education for All." To bring awareness and generate concrete steps to eliminating violence against women, Iraq's Kurdistan Teachers' Union (KTU) launched a series of initiatives to mobilise the public.

Read more...

USA: educators play key role in combatting human trafficking

USA: educators play key role in combatting human trafficking

American education unions are taking the fight against human trafficking to the classroom, with a toolkit designed to help teachers recognise and act in case a student is suspected of being a victim. To counter trafficking, the National Education Association, one of Education International’s (EI) affiliates in the United States, is working to better equip educators, as first responders, to play a critical role in curbing this gross violation of human rights. To that end, the union has created an on-line toolkit with useful resources on human trafficking and links to organisations involved in the fight against this global phenomenon.

Read more...

Impacts of the Privatization of Public Education

The political economy of public sector failure is wholly ignored when schools are declared failing and threatened with closure. Further, parents, guardians, community members, educators, and youth are systematically excluded from decisions to close schools and plans to redesign their replacements. The cover story about saving communities from educational crisis grows a bit suspect when the very communities presumably being saved are kept out of the process--and their children are often denied admission to the replacement schools.

Read more...

The Measure of Our Humanity: Nobel Peace Laureates Promote Solutions to Refugee Crisis, Terrorism, Climate Change and Nuclear Annihilation

The Measure of Our Humanity: Nobel Peace Laureates Promote Solutions to Refugee Crisis, Terrorism, Climate Change and Nuclear Annihilation

In November the 15th World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates crafted the Barcelona Declaration. They addressed the crisis of refugees and the violence of terrorism with a focus on positive policies focused on root causes. A measure of a civilization is how it treats the most vulnerable. From that perspective, it is necessary to look with compassion on the lives disrupted by the civil war in Syria, drug-driven corruption in Central America and Mexico, chaos arising from the invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan, and the poverty driven multiple crises arising in Africa from dysfunctional governance, the failure of the rule of law, hyper-exploitation, and environmental degradation.

Read more...

Working for world peace here at home

David Smith suggests that to hope and pray for peace, though showing good intentions, will not prevent the tragedies we might face. Though most are not connected to efforts that focus directly on preventing violence, everyone can work for world peace in 2016. He suggests five things everyone can do to work for peace: learn about conflict, engage and share, model peace, identify and use peaceful means, and support good policies.

Read more...

---

Action Alerts

---
International Children's Peace Prize: Call for Nominations

International Children's Peace Prize: Call for Nominations

The International Children's Peace Prize is awarded annually to a child who fights courageously for children's rights. Each year's winner has, in his or her own way, demonstrated tremendous commitment to combating problems that millions of children face. The winner will receive the statuette 'Nkosi, which shows how a child sets the world in motion, a study grant, and a worldwide platform to promote his or her ideals to the benefit of children's rights. Furthermore, KidsRights will invest a project fund of €100,000 in projects that are closely connected to the winner's area of work, in the country of the winner. Nominations are due March 14.

Read more.

---

Resources

(Curricula, Research, Policy)

---
210px-Teaching_for_Change_logo

When and How to Talk with Young Children about Enslavement: Discussion Questions for Educators

When, as well as how, do we talk with children about slavery? At what age do we first introduce the topic, and what concepts do we communicate at different ages? When do we think children can both cognitively understand and emotionally handle the truth about the realities of slavery? Here are some suggested questions prepared by Louise Derman-Sparks and Julie Olsen Edwards for Teaching for Change to help the early childhood community, families, and social justice activists to get started on this essential discussion.

Read more...

Links between education and peace

This overview by Stephen Thompson, commissioned by the Governance and Social Development Resource Centre (GSDRC), outlines the links and contributions of education to peace. Education is a significant contributor to peace, and appears in two of the 24 indicators in the Positive Peace Index produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace. Education can lead to peace and be a part of ‘building back better’ by supporting the transformation of the security situation, political institutions, economic regeneration and social development. However, education policies can also contribute to the escalation of conflict if they are poorly designed or implemented.

Read more...

How Fears of Deportation Harm Kids’ Education

How Fears of Deportation Harm Kids’ Education

This article by The Atlantic observes that educators, advocates, and community and elected leaders are questioning the untold hardship on schoolchildren as America limps along with seemingly complex, confusing immigration laws and regulations. A 2013 study by the advocacy organization Human Impact Partners, “Family Unity, Family Health,” found that the deportation scares take a mental and physical toll on undocumented immigrants’ children. Researchers linked the threat of detention and deportation to poorer educational outcomes, concluding: “U.S.-citizen children who live in families under threat of detention or deportation will finish fewer years of school and face challenges focusing on their studies.”

Read more...

Waging Peace in Our Schools: Beginning with the Children

Waging Peace in Our Schools: Beginning with the Children

This article by Linda Lantieri (1995) looks at The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) began in New York City. This program is for teachers, students, administrators, and parents who seek to make schools and society more peaceful through creative means. RCCP was developed because of the increasing statistics of violent acts that take place in U.S. schools and the increasing number of suicides and homicides by young people. RCCP helps people recognize different ways to resolve conflicts through peaceful means rather than through the violent acts young people see perpetuated in the media.

Read more...

Education for Peace in the Classroom - Curriculum Development Strategies and Materials: A Case Study from Ireland

Education for Peace in the Classroom - Curriculum Development Strategies and Materials: A Case Study from Ireland

This paper by Paul Rogers (1991) describes the curriculum development process involved in the production of a set of peace education materials developed by the churches in Ireland during a 13 year period. Rogers suggests one important issue for future development is an understanding that much of the theory of peace, for example in areas of conflict resolution and human rights education and nonviolence, has yet to be translated into concrete programs for school use.

Read more...

Building a Peace Education Program: Critical Reflections on the Notre Dame University Experience in the Philippines

Building a Peace Education Program: Critical Reflections on the Notre Dame University Experience in the Philippines

This paper draws upon the experiential and theoretical insights gained from 5 years of developing a peace education program at Notre Dame University in the Philippines. The critical reflections on that experience encompass the processes, relationships, and structures embodied in the program, and its achievements, constraints, difficulties, and prospects for the future. It is hoped that a case study of peace education in the Philippine context, which is burdened by such deep crises of conflict, violence, and human suffering, may yield meaningful answers and questions for enhancing the craft and struggle of educating for peace, justice, and compassion.

Read more...

Peace Education around the World at the Beginning of the 1990s: Some Data from Questionnaires to Ministries of Education and Members of the Peace Education Commission

Peace Education around the World at the Beginning of the 1990s: Some Data from Questionnaires to Ministries of Education and Members of the Peace Education Commission

Two questionnaire studies on the status of peace education in different countries or regions in the early 1990s are presented in this paper by Ake Bjerstedt. One of the studies approached school authorities--ministries of education or similar offices, the other collected views from members of the Peace Education Commission of IPRA. It was observed, among other things, that many countries do not have any recommendations on peace education in their official school texts. Nevertheless, there was a substantial minority of countries where such recommendations existed. The study concluded that it should be an important task for educators and researchers to try to understand the character of the resistance or the difficulties in each particular area better and to use this understanding to find ways to overcome the barriers.

Read more...

Pricey Bargains

Pricey Bargains

Climate change, species extinction, pollution and poverty: The world seems to go down the drain! There are many reasons for these problems. One reason of particular importance is rooted deep in our economic system. This video, produced by Edeos offers an explanation. What are your thoughts on the relationship of the global economy to the climate, pollution and poverty?

Read more...

Teach Peace: 2nd Edition

Teach Peace: 2nd Edition

Building on the remarkable success of the first edition, the Peace Education Network (United Kingdom) are delighted to present the second edition of Teach Peace revised and updated for 2016. In Teach Peace you will find ten assemblies, follow-up activities, resources, prayers, and reflections on peace and peacemaking for 5-12 year olds.

Read more...

To get into college, Harvard report advocates for kindness instead of overachieving

To get into college, Harvard report advocates for kindness instead of overachieving

A new report released today by Making Caring Common, a project of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, takes a major step in trying to change the college admissions process to make it more humane, less super-human. Parents, educators and college administrators have long wrestled with the unintended negative side effects of the admissions process, like the intense focus on personal achievement and the unfair advantages of more affluent students. The report, entitled Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern for Others and the Common Good Through College Admissions, aims to tackle these complex issues. It lays out a blueprint for addressing three of the most intractable challenges facing college applicants today: excessive academic performance pressure, the emphasis on personal achievement over good citizenship, and the uneven opportunities available to students of varying income levels and backgrounds.

Read more...

New IPB Training Tools - "Reaching Out to All Learners: a Resource Pack for Supporting Inclusive Education"

New IPB Training Tools - "Reaching Out to All Learners: a Resource Pack for Supporting Inclusive Education"

Inclusive education is an over-guiding principle of the 2030 Education Agenda embodied in the SDG 4 “Ensure and equitable quality education and promote lifelong opportunities for all”. We are pleased to announce the IBE (UNESCO International Bureau of Education) new publication: "Reaching Out to All Learners: a Resource Pack for Supporting Inclusive Education." As part of the IBE series of Training Tools for Curriculum Development, this resource pack shares a broader understanding of the theory and practice of inclusive education to review national policies and support its effective implementation at the school and classroom level.

Read more...

UNESCO Clearinghouse on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

UNESCO Clearinghouse on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

UNESCO has just released a Clearinghouse on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), containing important information, news, events, good practices and links around the Global Action Programme on ESD (GAP). It aims to serve as an online platform to share knowledge, experiences and competences of the ESD global community of practic

Read more...

Tragic Pages: How the GDR, FRG and Japan Processed Their War History--Lessons for Education for Peace

Tragic Pages: How the GDR, FRG and Japan Processed Their War History--Lessons for Education for Peace

Robert Aspeslagh (1992) describes the ways in which Japan and the German nations have taught the history of World War II. The document argues that there is a continued need for peace education concerning World War II, but there is also a need to avoid negative politicization of the issue.

Read more...

Conflict-Mitigation: Philosophy & Methodology. Peace Education Miniprints No. 56.

Conflict-Mitigation: Philosophy & Methodology. Peace Education Miniprints No. 56.

Jan Oberg (1994) describes conflict-mitigation as a concept and methodology that emphasizes a broad societal understanding of conflicts obtained mainly through in-depth interviewing with many and varied actors. Developed through the work by the Transnational Foundation for Peace and Future Research (TFF), the conflict-mitigation process is intended to serve a number of purposes.

Read more...

Peace Education: Perspectives from Germany and Israel. Peace Education Miniprints No. 44.

Peace Education: Perspectives from Germany and Israel. Peace Education Miniprints No. 44.

In this paper, Ake Bjerstedt (1993) share work of the project group "Preparedness for Peace" at the Lund University Malmo School of Education in Sweden that studies ways of helping children and young people to deal constructively with questions of peace and war. As part of this work, experts with special interests in competence in areas related to peace education are interviewed. This publication explores the views of Haim Gordon from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and Christoph Wulf from Freie Universitat, Berlin, Germany.

Read more...

Peace Education: An Historical Overview (1843-1939). Peace Education Miniprints No. 101

Peace Education: An Historical Overview (1843-1939). Peace Education Miniprints No. 101

This paper, by Verdiana Grossi (2000), suggests that peace education has come a long way, but its history is not very well known. The paper gives an historical overview, focusing on European developments from 1843-1939, and cites the London Peace Conference of 1843 and the Universal Peace Conferences as examples of bridging the principles of peace and the classroom. Glimpses are given of a number of important peace educators and activists. Early educational and psychological research is illustrated with Jean Piaget's work. The text asks these questions of the future: "How can the culture of peace become a world culture?"; "How will the educational system face up to the challenges of an ever-changing multicultural society?"; and "Is it possible to create a world citizen?"

Read more...

Peace Education in the Early Childhood/Elementary Education Classroom: Setting the Agenda for a Humane World

This paper by Blythe Hinitz & Aline Stomfay-Stitz (1998) identifies and clarifies the role that peace education can play in the creation of a humane, nonviolent learning environment; highlights recent research on brain-based learning that holds significance for the inclusion of peace education in the curriculum, especially with integration of the arts and humanities; and demonstrates and invites participation in workshop activities that enhance the quest for a peaceful school and classroom.

Read more...

Peace Education and Conflict Resolution through the Expressive Arts in Early Childhood Education and Teacher Education

This paper by Blythe Hinitz & Aline Stomfay-Stitz (1999) suggests several modes of expressive arts may be especially appropriate for peace education and conflict resolution instruction in early childhood and teacher education classrooms. This paper explores the integration of the concepts and processes of peace education and conflict resolution through an examination of current research and professional development publications, as well as observations made in selected U.S. early education and teacher education classrooms.

Read more...

My Journey as a Peace Educator. Peace Education Miniprints No. 100.

This paper by Fran Schmidt (2000) discusses the need to prepare teachers as agents for a culture of peace. It notes that the core values in a culture of peace are environmental sustainability, cultural diversity, human solidarity, social responsibility, and gender equality. For each of these values, there is a complementary human capacity to be developed through teacher education, making it possible for teachers to cultivate these values and capacities in their students. These capacities are ecological awareness, cultural competency, global agency, conflict proficiency, and gender sensitivity. The paper suggests a number of recommendations to help promote developments in these directions, addressing them to UNESCO, ministries of education, and educational and professional associations.

Read more...

---

Learn & Do

(Events & Conferences, Academic Courses, Programs of Study,
Trainings & Workshops, Campaigns, Youth Focused Events)

For a full list of events visit the Global Peace Education Calendar!

---
2016 Hague Symposium on Post-Conflict Transitions & International Justice

2016 Hague Symposium on Post-Conflict Transitions & International Justice

At the 2016 The Hague Symposium, in cooperation with Clingendael Institute, you will grapple with the “wicked questions” around post-conflict transitions and international justice that continue to challenge policymakers, scholars, and practitioners.  By learning about available mechanisms, options, and theories, you will gain a cross-sectoral perspective and a new way of thinking about why some transitions succeed where others fail.In …

Read more...

2016 Bologna Symposium on Conflict Prevention, Resolution & Reconciliation

2016 Bologna Symposium on Conflict Prevention, Resolution & Reconciliation

New types of conflict challenge classic methods of conflict management and resolution. Collapsed and fragile states, autonomous networks of illegal activities, the speed of information, and extremist revolutionary movements are all part of the complex conflict kaleidoscope that must be addressed by the contemporary peacebuilder.As a modern peace leader you will need a toolkit of essential practical skills, but also appropriate …

Read more...

Peace Education: Quatar's Engagement in the Mapping of Policies, Programs & Resources in Africa (workshop)

Peace Education: Quatar's Engagement in the Mapping of Policies, Programs & Resources in Africa (workshop)

This international workshop seeks to advance our understanding and knowledge base of using education as a peace building and social cohesion development tool in Sub-Saharan Africa. It builds upon the excellent work of the Qatar's Education Above All initiative through the analysis of existing approaches, including conflict-sensitivity and rights-based approaches to education to analyze efforts for peace building and protective …

Read more...

2016 Global Solutions Lab: Human Rights, Sustainable Development & Design for Eliminating Extreme Poverty by 2030

2016 Global Solutions Lab: Human Rights, Sustainable Development & Design for Eliminating Extreme Poverty by 2030

Ever heard about a cool innovation and said, “I wish I’d thought of that!”? The Global Solutions Lab gives you the skills to do just that with a strategic design and planning, problem-solving methodology developed by Buckminster Fuller and other scientists and designers.The Lab focuses its efforts on the United Nations’s new Sustainable Development Goals that see to eliminate extreme …

Read more...

Caux Scholars Program: A multi-disciplinary approach to conflict transformation, transitional justice, and principled leadership

Caux Scholars Program: A multi-disciplinary approach to conflict transformation, transitional justice, and principled leadership

Twenty scholars from around the world are selected for this four-week course held in Caux, Switzerland, during the Initiatives of Change global summer conferences. Since its creation in 1991, CSP has over 500 alumni from 105 countries; still connected to each other through a global network. They are active in international organizations, NGOs, politics, education, business and communications around the …

Read more...

3rd International Summer School Learning from the past - Exploring the Role of Transitional Justice in Rebuilding Trust in a Post-conflict Society

3rd International Summer School Learning from the past - Exploring the Role of Transitional Justice in Rebuilding Trust in a Post-conflict Society

This international summer school is the third summer school organized by the IUS’ International Relations department; this year, in cooperation with the IUS Faculty of Law and the IUS Lifelong Learning Center. The first summer school, titled “Cross Continental - Interethnic Relations for Peace” (CCIRP), and the second summer school, titled “Learning from the past: 20 Years after the Bosnian War – …

Read more...

Women’s Human Rights Education Institute

Women’s Human Rights Education Institute

This unique educational institute brings feminist perspectives and an activist orientation to the inextricably related issues of peace, human rights and life-sustaining development. Participants will gain an understanding of the global economic, ecological, legal, cultural and political contexts of this work, as well as of the groundbreaking work that is currently being done and has been done over decades by …

Read more...

Teaching Peace in Schools: Cultivating Restorative School Communities (Virtual Summit - Feb 1 & 3)

Teaching Peace in Schools: Cultivating Restorative School Communities (Virtual Summit - Feb 1 & 3)

This free virtual telesummit features inspiring wisdom and leadership from the field of Restorative Justice and Social & Emotional Learning in schools. It will explore bringing these critical skills into school communities.Join this free summit, via phone or webcast, to learn practical examples and methods that can be brought into our schools to improve our children's lives, setting them up …

Read more...

Teaching Peace in the 21st Century: 8th Annual Summer Institute for Faculty

Teaching Peace in the 21st Century: 8th Annual Summer Institute for Faculty

The University of Notre Dame's Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) invite you and your team to register for the 8th Annual Summer Institute for Faculty in Peace Studies Program Development, June 13 - 17, 2016.The Summer Institute brings together teams of academics who want to launch a peace studies program at their …

Read more...

The Peace and Justice Studies Association 2016 Annual Conference

The Peace and Justice Studies Association 2016 Annual Conference

Obstructing the Old or Constructing the New? Embracing the Tension to Build the World We WantSeptember 22-24, 2016.  Selkirk College.  Nelson and Castlegar, British Columbia, CanadaCALL FOR PROPOSALSProposal Submission Deadline: April 1, 2016As peace scholars, educators and activists, we are often torn between opposing, challenging and resisting what we don’t want, and visioning, creating and constructing what we do want. But knowing when …

Read more...

ICNC Webinar - Dr. King's Letter from Birmingham Jail: Lessons for Civil Resistance Movements

ICNC Webinar - Dr. King's Letter from Birmingham Jail: Lessons for Civil Resistance Movements

This live academic webinar will be presented by Tom Hastings, faculty in the graduate program of Conflict Resolution at Portland State University and an ICNC Academic Advisor.This webinar looks at timeless lessons included in Dr. King's letter dated on April 16, 1963, and smuggled out of a Birmingham jail where King and nearly 50 other protesters stayed imprisoned.Dr. King participated …

Read more...

---

Knowledge

(Publications & Book Reviews)

---
Turning Trauma into the Abolition of War

Turning Trauma into the Abolition of War

Chappell’s latest book, The Cosmic Ocean: New Answers to Big Questions, is the fifth in a projected seven-part series. Like a sculptor pounding out variations on a theme, Chappell each year produces a newer, thicker, wiser, and more illuminating take on the questions that tear at his heart: How can we be so kind and cause such suffering? How can we fail to care about others just like ourselves? What sort of change is possible and how can it be brought about?

Read more...

This Is an Uprising: How Nonviolent Revolt Is Shaping the Twenty-First Century

This Is an Uprising: How Nonviolent Revolt Is Shaping the Twenty-First Century

From protests around climate change and immigrant rights, to Occupy, the Arab Spring, and #BlackLivesMatter, a new generation is unleashing strategic nonviolent action to shape public debate and force political change. When mass movements erupt onto our television screens, the media consistently portrays them as being spontaneous and unpredictable. Yet, in this book, Mark and Paul Engler look at the hidden art behind such outbursts of protest, examining core principles that have been used to spark and guide moments of transformative unrest.

Read more...

justpeace-ethics-book-cover

Free ebook: "Justpeace Ethics: A Guide for Restorative Justice and Peacebuilding" with Foreword by Howard Zehr

"Justpeace Ethics: A Guide for Restorative Justice and Peacebuilding" by Jarem Sawatsky is free as an ebook download for a limited time. From the author: Have you ever wondered how to do conflict transformation, peacemaking or restorative justice work, so that every step of overflows with peace and justice? Drawing on personal interviews with some of the great peace and restorative justice practitioners, through this book you will discover how analysis, intervention, and evaluation of peace and justice activities can be rooted in a justice and peace are inseparable and pursued together.

Read more...

Peace Education: International Perspectives

Peace Education: International Perspectives

Edited by Monisha Bajaj and Maria Hantzopolous, "Peace Education: International Perspectives" brings together the voices of scholars and practitioners on challenges and possibilities of implementing peace education in diverse global sites and addresses key questions for students seeking to deepen their understanding of the field. The book not only highlights ground-breaking and rich qualitative studies from around the globe, but also analyses the limits and possibilities of peace education in diverse contexts of conflict and post-conflict societies.

Read more...

Henry F. De Sio, Jr.: "Why Empathy Is As Important as Reading and Math"

Henry F. De Sio, Jr.: "Why Empathy Is As Important as Reading and Math"

Henry F. De Sio, Jr., Global Chair for Framework Change at Ashoka; author of "Campaign, Inc: How Leadership and Organization Propelled Barack Obama to the White House" and former Deputy Assistant to President Obama recently served as the keynote speaker at the International Symposium on the "Transformative Nature of Education: Underpinning Social and Economic Transformation." His address, entitled "New Literacy and the Changemaker Generation: Why Empathy Is As Important as Reading and Math” discusses how the "changemaker effect" is accelerating the transition to a world characterized by rapid change, which is the polar opposite of the world of repetition that society has long known.

Read more...

Announcing the Peace Science Digest

Announcing the Peace Science Digest

The Peace Science Digest provides analysis and access to the top research in the field of Peace and Conflict Studies. Published monthly, the Digest aims to provide a mutually beneficial link between the field’s academic community and its practitioners, the media, activists, public policy-makers, and other possible beneficiaries. The Peace Science Digest is formulated to enhance awareness of literature addressing the key war prevention issues of our time by making available an organized, condensed and comprehensible analysis. We are creating a resource for the practical application of the field’s academic knowledge.

Read more...

Changing Militarized Societies through Gender-Sensitive Peace Education

This paper by Loreta Navarro-Castro, presented at the conference on “Gender and Militarism” co-organized by the Women Peacemakers Program (The Netherlands) and Center for Peace Education of Miriam College, 7-8 December 2015, conceptualizes peace education as education that transforms mindsets, attitudes and values as well as behaviors that bring about and/or exacerbate violent conflicts. Hence, it is education that promotes nonviolence and the nonviolent resolution of conflicts from the personal to national to global levels as well as promotes human and ecological well-being, which includes just structures and relationships at various levels. This view of peace education springs from an understanding of peace as both the absence of violence and the presence of justice. Because of this holistic focus on transforming mindsets, values and behaviors, peace education is understood as education toward a culture of peace.

Read more...

Pre-deciding About Violence

Pre-deciding About Violence

Elizabeth and Lionel Traubman (2015) argue that pre-deciding about violence, beginning at home and then rippling out globally, is the most urgent need of our time. It is our best hope in this era of widespread atomic, biological, and chemical weapons when even a few people can do a lot of harm. Whether with physical punishment or all-out war, the stunning paradox of our time is that rejecting violence and dignifying our adversary – not humiliating, harming, or excluding – is the response that gets the best results.

Read more...

Human Rights Education Beyond Universalism and Relativism: A Relational Hermeneutic for Global Justice. Fuad Al-Daraweesh, Dale T. Snauwaert

Human Rights Education Beyond Universalism and Relativism: A Relational Hermeneutic for Global Justice. Fuad Al-Daraweesh, Dale T. Snauwaert

"Human Rights Education Beyond Universalism and Relativism" transcends the long-standing debate concerning universalism and cultural relativism in the human rights discourse by offering a culturally-sensitive, freestanding conceptualization of human rights. Examining the conflict between universalism and relativism, one of the most controversial issues in the theory of human rights, Al-Daraweesh and Snauwaert ask the question: On what grounds can a conception of human rights and human rights education be both universal in scope and respectful of cultural pluralism? Within the framework of a relational and hermeneutic epistemology, Al-Daraweesh and Snauwaert explore the idea of the fusion of human rights horizons within and across cultures as a means of realizing global justice.

Read more...

---

Jobs & Funding

(Job Postings & Funding Opportunities)

---
Senior Program Director: Peace First (Boston, MA - USA)

Senior Program Director: Peace First (Boston, MA - USA)

Peace First seeks a Senior Program Director to oversee the development and roll-out of an ambitious new program that will build a global network of young peacemakers (with a focus on youth ages 13 – 18), which is set to launch in September 2016. This role will be initially focused on the high-quality design and production of a digital community that will educate and engage young people as leaders responding to pressing social issues, using our 20+ years of curriculum content and our thousands of on-the-ground partners built through the Peace First Prize. With time, the program will expand to include local events in key markets around the world, social media, and celebrity engagement.

Read more...

Grinnell College: Peace and Conflict Studies Program Two-Year Mellon Postdoctoral Position

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program at Grinnell College invites applications for a two year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow appointment in Peace and Conflict Studies with an affiliation in one of the following departments: Anthropology, Sociology, Political Science, and/or Religious Studies beginning Fall 2016.

Read more...

ICNC Curriculum Fellowship for Classroom-Based and Online Teaching on Civil Resistance

ICNC Curriculum Fellowship for Classroom-Based and Online Teaching on Civil Resistance

The International Center for Nonviolent Conflict (ICNC) is launching the third edition of its popular Curriculum Fellowship program to support and advance both classroom-based and online teaching on civil resistance. In 2016, up to eight curriculum fellowships, each in the amount of $1,300, will be offered on open, merit and competitive bases to university and college faculty and instructors to develop either a curriculum unit on civil resistance that will be incorporated into the existing classroom-based, elective or mandatory, semester-long course at the applicant’s home university or an online seminar on civil resistance that will be offered to students and interested participants from applicant’s university, town, district, country or the region.

Read more...

Managing Director: One Common Unity

One Common Unity is a non-profit organization that inspires personal growth and nurtures sustainable, caring communities through social-emotional learning services and arts empowerment programming. The Managing Director’s role is to provide operational and programmatic support to further One Common Unity’s mission. Reporting to and working closely with the Executive Director, the Managing Director will oversee operations, programs, planning, and support the integration of the work of the organization into a cohesive whole.

Read more...

Program Officer: USIP Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding

The Program Officer position serves as the senior conflict resolution trainer in the Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding at the United States Institute of Peace. The Program Officer is responsible for the design and delivery of conflict resolution trainings, the development of materials (simulations and cases) for online courses, and the creation of new partnerships leading to the creation of additional onsite courses and programs.

Read more...

Amnesty International: Human Rights Education Project Manager (Regional Office Beirut)

Amnesty International’s Regional Office in Beirut is looking for an experienced Human Rights Education Project Manager to lead the editing, compilation, design, development and dissemination of offline and online human rights education materials and maintain a wider online platform including an eLearning space in Arabic and English.

Read more...

Two year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow appointment in Peace and Conflict Studies

The Peace and Conflict Studies Program invites applications for a two year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow appointment in Peace and Conflict Studies with affiliation in one of the following departments: Anthropology, Sociology, Political Science and/or Religious Studies beginning Fall 2016. Applicants must have received their PhD no earlier than August 2013 and no later than August 2016 in one of the above fields. Research and teaching interests might include, but are not limited to: Conflict Analysis, Conflict Transformation, Human Rights. The teaching load is one course a semester for two years.

Read more...

Now Accepting Applications for the Rotary Peace Fellowship

Now Accepting Applications for the Rotary Peace Fellowship

The Rotary Foundation is now accepting applications for the fully-funded Rotary Peace Fellowship. The fellowship provides academic and practical training to prepare scholars for leadership roles in solving today’s global challenges. Up to 100 fellows are selected globally every year to earn either a master’s degree or a professional development certificate in peace and conflict studies at one of six Rotary Peace Centers at leading universities in Australia, England, Japan, the United States, Sweden and Thailand.

Read more...

---
---